Subscribe:

Pages

Friday, May 25, 2012

Causes of Lung Cancer


From many studies, it can be concluded, here are some causes of lung cancer :
Smoke
Incidence of lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, with approximately 90% of cancer-lung cancer arising as a result of tobacco use. Lung cancer risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked. Pipe and cigar smoking can also cause lung cancer, although the risk is not as high as with cigarette smoking. Where a person who smoked a pack of cigarettes per day had a risk of developing lung cancer is 25 times higher than the one who does not smoke, smokers have a pipe and cigar smoking to lung cancer risk is approximately 5 times than someone who does not smoke.

Tobacco smoke contains over 4,000 chemical compounds, many of these substances cause cancer, or carcinogenic. Two-carcinogenic carcinogenic tobacco smoke is a major in chemicals known as nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.
Passive smoking
Asbestos is a silicate fibers Fibers that can persist for a lifetime in lung tissue. Asbestos workers who do not smoke have a risk by five times to develop lung cancer than non-smokers and asbestos workers who smoke have a risk of 50 to 90 times greater than nonsmokers.
Radon gas
Radon gas is a noble gas is naturally occurring chemical and is a breakdown product of natural uranium. Radon gas is a known cause of lung cancer, with an estimated 12% of lung cancer deaths caused by radon gas, or 15.000 to 22.000 deaths associated with lung cancer every year in America, making radon the second leading cause of cancer lung in the United States. Radon gas can move through soil and enter the house through gaps between the foundations, pipes, ducts, or other open spaces. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that one out of every 15 homes in the United States contain levels of radon gas is dangerous. Radon gas is invisible and odorless, but it can be detected by the box is a simple test.
Lung diseases
The presence of certain lung diseases, particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is associated with a slightly increased risk (four to six times the risk of a non-smoker) to develop lung cancer even after the effects of smoking cigarettes has dispensed simultaneously.
Air pollution
Air pollution from vehicles, industry, and places of power (electricity) can increase the likelihood of developing lung cancer in exposed individuals. Up to 1% of lung cancer deaths are caused by breathing polluted air, and experts believe that prolonged exposure (long) at very high polluted air may carry a risk similar to that of passive smoking to develop lung cancer.

0 comments:

Post a Comment